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Aquaculture CRSP 21st Annual Technical Report
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Income, Food Security, and Poverty Reduction: Case Studies of Functioning Clusters
of Successful Small-Scale Aquaculture Producers

Tenth Work Plan, Food Security Research 1 (10FSR1)
Final Report

Joseph J. Molnar, Elizabeth Trejos-Castillo, Pablo Martínez-Mejía
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
International Center for Aquaculture and Aquatic Environments
Auburn University, Alabama, USA

Suyapa Triminio Meyer and Daniel Meyer
Agricultural Production and Science
Escuela Agrícola Panamericana El Zamorano
Zamorano, Honduras

E. William Tollner and Brahm Verma
Biological and Agricultural Engineering
University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia, USA

George Pilz
Natural Resources Management
Escuela Agrícola Panamericana El Zamorano
Zamorano, Honduras

Abstract

Aquaculture plays an identifiable role in helping rural Hondurans achieve food and income security, but there is a need for a better understanding of how tilapia culture works at the village level. This report summarizes two case studies of locations where practicing tilapia farmers have managed to grow repeated crops of tilapia over an extended period. Lessons learned from actual circumstances where tilapia culture is a regularized component of local farming systems could provide realistic guidance to efforts to foster aquacultural development. A central constituency for this information lays in an aggregate of agencies and organizations that features aquaculture as one component in its array of development interventions. Understanding gained from case studies of successful clusters of practicing fish farmers can better direct aquaculture’s inclusion in current and future development initiatives. Case studies of sustained practice of tilapia culture were based on reviews of available documents, interviews with officials, extended conversations with fish farmers, visits to rural communities, and other sources of information. We interviewed 54 subsistence producers in Santa Barbara, Honduras, and ten commercial producers in Olancho, Honduras, obtaining financial information from the latter firms as well. The results suggest that certain patterns of technical assistance and conditions of solidarity and collaboration among producers fostered the sustained practice of tilapia culture in both locales. Certain cautions and vulnerabilities are identified in each place, as well as implications for technical assistance and research.
realistic guidance for the network of national and regional institutions dedicated to advancing aquacultural development. Another constituency for this information lays in the broader aggregate of agencies and organizations that feature aquaculture as one component in its array of development interventions.

Understandings gained from case studies of successful
Introduction

Aquaculture plays an identifiable role in helping rural Hondurans achieve food and income security, but there is a need for better understanding of how tilapia culture works at the village level (Molnar and Lovshin, 1995). Lessons learned from actual circumstances where tilapia is a regularized component of local farming systems could provide