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9ADR5-Regional Outreach in Africa

PD/A CRSP Nineteenth Annual Technical Report
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Cite as: [Author(s), 2002. Title.] In: K. McElwee, K. Lewis, M. Nidiffer, and P. Buitrago (Editors), Nineteenth Annual Technical Report. Pond Dynamics/Aquaculture CRSP, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, [pp. ___.]

Regional Outreach in Africa

Ninth Work Plan, Adoption/Diffusion Research 5 (9ADR5)
Final Report

Karen L. Veverica
Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures
Auburn University, Alabama, USA

James R. Bowman
Department of Fisheries and Wildlife
Oregon State University
Corvallis, Oregon, USA

Bethuel Omolo
Kenya Fisheries Department
Sagana, Kenya

Abstract

The goal of the Kenya Project's regional outreach activity has been to promote contact and communication among aquaculture research and extension personnel and organizations throughout the region. This was originally intended to be achieved mainly through participation at regional meetings and conferences, not only by presenting papers but also through participation in planning and organizing the meetings. It was hoped that such participation would help promote the dissemination of information emanating from PD/A CRSP research, help conference participants learn about fish culture practices and research priorities and activities in Kenya and in neighboring countries, and encourage the establishment of regional linkages among research and extension programs in the region. Several CRSP participants attended the Annual Conference of the World Aquaculture Society and the Annual Meeting of the PD/A CRSP in Orlando, Florida, in January 2001. This was followed by visits to research facilities at Auburn University and commercial operations in West Alabama.

Introduction

The intent of this activity has been to promote contact and communication among aquaculture research and extension personnel and organizations throughout the region. This was to be achieved mainly through participation at regional meetings, not only by presenting papers but also through participation in planning and organizing the meetings and in helping to develop and implement plans to increase participation in them. Through this effort, research results from current and previous CRSP activities could be shared, linkages with other African researchers could be established and future collaboration encouraged, and CRSP partners would be able to learn about research and extension efforts in other parts of the region. Regional meetings originally targeted for attendance included annual meetings of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Inland Fisheries Sector Technical Coordination Unit and of the Fisheries Society of Africa (FISA), but other conference opportunities, including some outside of Africa were also attended when deemed appropriate.

The objectives specifically listed for this effort in the Ninth Work Plan were to:

  1. Promote the dissemination of information emanating from PD/A CRSP research results;
  2. Learn about fish culture practices and research priorities and activities in Kenya and neighboring countries in Africa; and
  3. Encourage the establishment of regional linkages between research and extension programs in Africa.
  4. This activity continues from a similar activity (8KR5, "Regional outreach in Africa") in the Eighth Work Plan.

Outreach Activities Conducted

Opportunities for travel to and participation in meetings within the region were limited in the current reporting period, so we took the opportunity to fund travel for David Liti (Moi University Department of Zoology and a very active CRSP collaborator at Sagana Fish Farm) to attend Aquaculture 2001, the annual conference and exposition of the World Aquaculture Society (WAS) in Orlando, Florida; to participate in the Annual Meeting of the PD/A CRSP (also in Orlando); and to visit aquaculture programs and facilities at Auburn University (AU) and in other parts of Alabama in early 2001. Although their travel was funded through other CRSP activities, Liti was joined by Nancy Gitonga, Director of Fisheries for the Kenya Fisheries Department, and Charles Ngugi, of the Moi University Department of Fisheries, for much of this travel. At the WAS meetings in Orlando, they were able to hear presentations on a variety of topics by aquaculture researchers from around the world, to meet with and interact with many of those researchers, and to see the kinds of supplies and equipment available for aquaculture displayed by the many industry exhibitors present. Liti presented a poster based on CRSP research at Sagana Fish Farm (9FFR2) entitled "Growth performance and economic benefits of Oreochromis niloticus and Clarias gariepinus polyculture in fertilized tropical ponds" (co-authored by Veverica and Moi University graduate student Enos Mac'Were). By participating in the CRSP Annual Meeting, Liti, Gitonga, and Ngugi were able to meet CRSP researchers from other countries and to get a better feeling for how the CRSP functions and what some of the other CRSP projects are about.

Following the meetings in Orlando, the Kenyan researchers were able to spend almost a week in Alabama, where they met with faculty members of the AU Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures, observed research activities and farm operations at the AU Fisheries Research Unit, and visited commercial aquaculture operations in West Alabama, including two catfish farms, a fish processing plant, and a fish feed mill. During the week they also met with Kenya Project participants Veverica, Tom Popma, and Bowman for brainstorming sessions regarding past and future CRSP activities in Kenya.

Anticipated Benefits

Participants in this activity, through presentations given and contacts made, have furthered the dissemination of information stemming from PD/A CRSP research. Through their contacts with researchers and extension personnel in Kenya, in the region, and overseas, they have learned about fish culture practices and research priorities, and they have gained a better understanding of research and extension needs. Application of the knowledge and experience gained from this activity will result in improved research-extension linkages in Kenya and the region. Extension services in Kenya and other African countries will benefit by being more closely linked with research institutions, and African researchers will have an enhanced understanding of research needs. Ultimately, fish producers throughout the region will benefit because these linkages will enable extension services not only to more easily convey farmers' needs to researchers, but also to extend new research results back to the farmers.

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