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9ADR9-Technical Assistance for Fingerling Production Serving Small- and Medium-Scale Tilapia Producers
PD/A CRSP Eighteenth Annual Technical Report
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Cite as: [Author(s), 2001. Title.] In: A. Gupta, K. McElwee, D. Burke, J. Burright, X. Cummings, and H. Egna (Editors), Eighteenth Annual Technical Report. Pond Dynamics/Aquaculture CRSP, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, [pp. ___.]

Technical Assistance for Fingerling Production Serving Small- and Medium-Scale Tilapia Producers

Ninth Work Plan, Adoption/Diffusion Research 9 (9ADR9)
Abstract

Thomas Popma
Department of Fisheries and Allied Aquacultures
Auburn University, Alabama, USA

Dan Meyer
Department of Biology
Escuela Agrícola Panamericana El Zamorano
Zamorano, Honduras

Abstract

A central issue for aquacultural development in Honduras is fingerling supply. Previous PD/A CRSP research reported that farmers in remote places found that fingerlings were difficult to obtain but did not consider this sufficient reason for withdrawing from fish farming. Prior researchers reported that the Comayagua research station, El Carao, is not a reliable supplier of fingerlings for area producers. This observation was recently confirmed by the Zamorano Principal Investigator (PI) and technician in this project. Private fingerling producers are few and generally geared to supply large-scale commercial operations. The overriding objective of this Adoption/Diffusion activity is to provide technical assistance and training to current and potential fingerling suppliers to small- and medium-scale tilapia producers in Honduras. During the project team visit to Zamorano in November 1999, a strategy and timetable were developed for implementing technical assistance and training of fingerling suppliers. Since then, at least 33 small- and medium-scale tilapia producers (each with 150 to 12,000 m2 of water surface) and 26 restaurants were interviewed by the Zamorano PI and technical team to assess the production and marketing demands for tilapia in Honduras. The Zamorano team continues to identify and provide technical assistance to regional fingerling producers. During September 2000, a fingerling production technical workshop will be provided by Zamorano and Auburn PIs for actual and prospective fingerling producers.

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