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Research Projects - PD/A CRSP 18th Admin Report
PD/A CRSP Eighteenth Annual Administrative Report

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Research Projects
Adoption/Diffusion Research

Subcontract No. RD010A-10

Staff

Auburn University, Alabama
Joseph J. Molnar US Principal Investigator, Project Leader
Malkia Lockhart Graduate Research Assistant (Bahamas; through December 1999; CRSP funded)
Steve Mikloucich Graduate Research Aide (US; from May 2000)

Sagana Fish Farm, Sagana, Kenya
Judith Amadiva Social Development Officer
Bethuel Omolo Head of Station (through December 1999)

Instituto de Investigaciones de la Amazonia Peruana, Iquitos, Peru
Fernando Alcántara Host Country Co-Principal Investigator
Salvador Tello Host Country Co-Principal Investigator

Background

Adoption/Diffusion Research investigates the barriers to assimilation of technological innovations through extension and training. Advances in basic understanding of the pond environment and cultural practices must eventually be translated and diffused to hatcheries, fish farmers, and other agencies and organizations involved in aquaculture development. Documenting the central mechanisms of transaction between fish farmers and the knowledge system in aquaculture is a fundamental objective of this work. Current activities build upon earlier Adoption/Diffusion Research, with a survey instrument that was used in Honduras, Thailand, Philippines, and Kenya being employed in Peru. This research completed Eighth Work Plan objectives of identifying farmer perceptions towards aquaculture, technology, and extension.

The following Eighth Work Plan investigations continued into the current reporting period:

Networking

CRSP researchers involved in Adoption/Diffusion research are collaborating with CARE/Peru and Terra Nuova, an Italian nongovernmental organization (NGO). The NGOs are using the study results to shape their community-level training and outreach programs to include aquaculture as an option for farmers and communities in Peru. CRSP researcher Fernando Alcántara, located at the Institute de Investigaciones de la Amazonia Peruana (IIAP), continues making presentations to CARE/Peru, local NGOs, and other groups in the Iquitos area.

Educational Outreach

Molnar has used his research and experiences with the PD/A CRSP as an aid in two graduate classes he teaches at Auburn, one on rural sociology and another on extension programs and methods.

Publications

Lockhart, M., 1999. Farmer perceptions of constraints on aquaculture development in Central Kenya: Market, household, and resource considerations. M.S. thesis, Auburn University, Alabama.
Molnar, J.J., 2000. Sound policies for food security: The role of culture and social organization. Rev. Agric. Econ., 21(2):489–498.

Presentations

Molnar, J.J., F. Alcántara, and S. Tello. Sustaining livelihoods, ecologies, and rural communities. Presented to the American Association for the Advancement of Science 2000 AAAS Annual Meeting and Science Innovation Exposition at Washington, DC, 17–22 February 2000.
Molnar, J.J., F. Alcántara, and S. Tello. Sustaining small-scale aquaculture in the Peruvian Amazon: Producer perceptions of constraints and opportunities. Presented to World Aquaculture 2000 at Nice, France, 2–6 May 2000.

Conferences

2000 AAAS Annual Meeting and Science Innovation Exposition at Washington, DC, 17–22 February 2000. (Molnar)
World Aquaculture 2000 at Nice, France, 2–6 May 2000. (Molnar)

Sources of Technical Assistance for Fish Farmers in the Peruvian Amazon

Eighth Work Plan, Adoption/Diffusion Research 1-2 (8ADR1-2)
Final Report

Joseph J. Molnar
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
International Center for Aquaculture and Aquatic Environments
Auburn University, Alabama, USA

Fernando Alcántara Bocanegra and Salvador Tello
Instituto de Investigaciones de la Amazonia Peruana
Iquitos, Peru

Abstract

Data were collected from a sample of 146 practicing fish farmers in the Napo, Tamishiyacu, and Tahuayo river systems areas north and south of Iquitos, Peru, as well as in the Iquitos-Nauta Road area directly south of the city. Fish farmers were identified in selected communities that were provided technical assistance in aquaculture by CARE/Peru and several other nongovernmental organizations. The data suggest few differences in extension experience and perceptions by species cultured, but there is a notable pattern of differences across three measures of farm size. Larger operators tended to have more contact with extension and were slightly more likely to want extension contact in the future. There was little difference by farm size regarding contact with university technicians working in aquaculture or contact with government fish stations. Nearly all farmers wanted extension contact in the future.

Identifying Goals and Priorities of Fish Farmers in the Peruvian Amazon

Eighth Work Plan, Adoption/Diffusion Research 1-3 (8ADR1-3)
Final Report

Joseph J. Molnar
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology
International Center for Aquaculture and Aquatic Environments
Auburn University, Alabama, USA

Fernando Alcántara Bocanegra and Salvador Tello
Instituto de Investigaciones de la Amazonia Peruana
Iquitos, Peru

Abstract

The Peruvian Amazon is in an advantageous situation for fish culture. Survey data from 146 practicing fish farmers show that they culture a variety of species, but regardless of the kind of fish they grow, farmers view fish culture in a positive light. While gamitana (Colossoma macropomum) is not the only Amazon fish to deserve special attention, it is the first species about which enough is known to both manage wild stocks and develop aquaculture. PD/A CRSP research at the Quistococha Station near Iquitos, Peru, focuses on this species. Most respondents grew a number of different species, planned to build more ponds, were content with growing fish, and felt the pond was the best use of the land it occupies. In addition, most felt that the pond was worth the work put into it. One of the most problematic aspects of owning a fish pond is the loss of inventory due to human or animal predation. The data show 58% of respondents indicating problems with people stealing fish; 75% of the tucanare (Cichla ocellaris) growers had this problem.

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