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PD/A CRSP, 418 Snell Hall
Oregon State University
Corvallis OR 97331-1643

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Aquaculture CRSP
Frequently Asked Questions

Organizational Inquiries (opportunities, collaboration, etc.)

Getting Started in Aquaculture

The Business of Aquaculture

Do you have any student jobs or scholarships?
The Aquaculture CRSP does not have any grants or scholarships available at this time. Our organization does publish a monthly newsletter listing available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. This publication, entitled EdOp Net, is free of charge and is available via email or paper mail; the listings can also be accessed via the internet on a searchable database on the ACRSP web site. Visit <
http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/edops/edop.html> to subscribe to the email or paper editions or to search the online database.

In addition, these other sites might be helpful:

Community of Science Funding Resources <http://fundingopps2.cos.com>

Aquaculture Network Information Center (AquaNIC) Job Services <http://www.aquanic.org/jobs/index.asp>

World Aquaculture Society Employment Services <http://darc.cms.udel.edu/wases/wasesinfo.htm>

(Please note that with the exception of EdOp Net, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I wish to find employment related to aquaculture, does the Aquaculture CRSP have any jobs available?
The Aquaculture CRSP does not have any aquaculture related positions available at this time. Our organization does publish a monthly newsletter listing available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. This publication, entitled EdOp Net, is free of charge and is available via email or paper mail; the listings can also be accessed via the internet on a searchable database on the ACRSP web site. Visit <
http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/edops/edop.html> to subscribe to the email or paper editions or to search the online database.

In addition, these other sites might be helpful:

Aquaculture Network Information Center (AquaNIC) Job Services <http://www.aquanic.org/jobs/index.asp>

World Aquaculture Society Employment Services <http://darc.cms.udel.edu/wases/wasesinfo.htm>

Environmental Career.com <http://www.environmentalcareer.info/jobseekers/index.asp>

Syracuse University Employment Resources <http://libwww.syr.edu/research/internet/earth/jobs.html>

Aquaculture Careers <http://dir.yahoo.com/Science/Agriculture/Aquaculture/>

(Please note that with the exception of EdOp Net, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am studying for an advanced degree in aquaculture. One of my degree requirements is that I serve as an intern. I am interested in an internship with an Aquaculture CRSP researcher. Would this be possible?
This sounds like an excellent idea. Because our organization is decentralized, the management headquarters would not necessarily be aware of internship opportunities or needs among our collaborating researchers. Your most effective course of action is to review our list of principal investigators at <
http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/projects_people/pi_list.html>. From there, you can determine which research areas and interests are in line with your own. You can then contact the specific researcher directly with your proposal.

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I have read a number of Aquaculture CRSP technical reports on your website, and I have follow up questions that I would like to ask.
Aquaculture CRSP researchers are actively working in their fields of expertise and would be glad to engage with you further. Once you have the names of the authors (principal investigators), you can access their contact information at <
http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/projects_people/pi_list.html> and from there, feel free to email them directly.

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I am a researcher in aquaculture, working at a university in [country], and I would very much like to become involved with the Aquaculture CRSP. How can I go about becoming a collaborator? Is my country eligible to receive USAID assistance?
Thank you for your interest. For the time being, our current CRSP grant from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) extends through mid-2006, and the period for submitting proposals under this grant has already passed. In other words, there is no opportunity for new partners to become formally involved in the program at this time.

Under the ”Collaborative Research Support Program” model, our projects collaborate directly with designated host countries through host country institutions (such as universities and research institutions). This collaboration is often initiated between Principal Investigators at US institutions and/or interested parties at host country institutions.

If you wish to explore possible future involvement with the Aquaculture CRSP via your research institution, your best course of action is to develop a relationship with a US researcher (based at a US institution) who would be interested in collaborating with you. You are welcome of course to contact any of the researchers listed on our website, <http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/projects_people/pi_list.html>. These are individuals who are currently involved in our program (and who may or may not be involved in the future). Your joint proposal could then be submitted to the Aquaculture CRSP in response to a future request for proposals, with the US institution as the primary proponent.

As more becomes known about the future of the program after 2006, we will update this information.

The list of USAID-eligible countries is modified periodically, so checking the USAID website <http://www.usaid.gov/> is always a good idea.

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I read an Aquaculture CRSP work plan description, and I think the work should have been completed by now, but I can’t find the results on your website.
In general, results from Aquaculture CRSP research will be available on our website with a delay of approximately six months for editing and production following the completion schedule noted in the work plan. In rare cases, research might be delayed because of unforeseen circumstances, and the results might not be published until the next annual reporting cycle. If you are not able to locate a specific report that you believe should already be available, please write to us, and we will confirm whether or not the report has been published.

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I would like information regarding importation of [species name] to my country, but there wasn’t anything on your website.
As an organization funded by the US government, we are not able to provide advice or consultation services regarding importation or other issues relating to commercial operations. Your best approach might be to check with the commerce and the wildlife ministries or agencies of your country’s government to see if they are able to provide you with practical information regarding importation. Equally important for you to become knowledgeable about are the relevant national regulations, especially as might concern potentially invasive species.

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Please send me all the information you have regarding Aquaculture CRSP research on [topic].
Unfortunately, it would likely not be feasible for us to send you everything that we have on a specific topic. In the most extreme case, it would be very costly—and it probably would not be very helpful in the end. The best approach for satisfying your interests is for you to search our website to find the specific reports that address your curiosity. With very few exceptions, reports can be downloaded as PDF files or viewed directly on the internet as HTML. Since our grant has ended, we no longer provide printed copies of these publications.

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How can I get started in freshwater shrimp aquaculture?
The Aquaculture CRSP has sponsored research on freshwater shrimp aquaculture in the past. These papers may be more technical than you are looking for, but you can access them at <

http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs>.

There are a number of other websites that can give you information for beginning freshwater shrimp aquaculture. An excellent source of information can be found at the AquaNIC website (<http://www.aquanic.org>). For information specifically on freshwater shrimp, select “Species” from the “Resources” menu and then “Shrimp.” Alternatively, you can go directly to <http://aquanic.org/beginer/shrimp/shrimp.htm>. Also, a number of online courses are listed on the AquaNIC website (from the “Resources” menu, select “Online Courses” and AquaNIC has a shrimp culture discussion group at <http://www.aquanic.org/discuss/shrimp.htm>.

You may also want to contact the Global Aquaculture Alliance. “The mission of the Global Aquaculture Alliance (GAA) is to further environmentally responsible aquaculture to meet world food needs.” The GAA has published the “Codes of Practice for Responsible Shrimp Farming,” a 40-page technical guide printed in both English and Spanish. See the Global Aquaculture Alliance website at: <http://www.gaalliance.org>; Email: homeoffice@gaalliance.org.

If you are interested in taking courses, there are several organizations that run short courses and workshops. You can keep up-to-date on when and where they are available by checking the Aquaculture CRSPs EdOp Net, a monthly publication that lists available postdoctoral fellowships, jobs, and short courses in the US and around the world. EdOp Net is free of charge. Visit <http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/edops/edop.html> to subscribe for the email or paper editions or to search the online database.

Another excellent resource, especially if you are in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP publication and EdOp Net websites, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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How can I get started in bullfrog farming?
The Aquaculture CRSP has never sponsored research on frog culture, but there are a variety of sources you can use to learn more about bullfrog farming.

The following websites may also help you:

http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/fisheries/420-255/420-255.html

http://aquanic.org/publicat/govagen/nal/frog_culture.htm

http://govdocs.aquake.org/cgi/content/abstract/2003/724/7240150

http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/profiles/bullfrog.shtml

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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How can I get started in perch aquaculture?
The Aquaculture CRSP has never sponsored research on perch aquaculture, but there are a number of other websites that can give you information for beginning freshwater perch aquaculture.

The following websites may help you:

http://govdocs.aquake.org/cgi/content/abstract/2003/528/5280250

http://www.agmrc.org/agmrc/commodity/aquaculture/yellowperch/

http://www.seagrant.wisc.edu/communications/news/LD_stories/2000/yellowperchaq.html

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am interested in learning more about lotus aquaculture.
The Aquaculture CRSP has supported work in this subject area, hosted at the Asian Institute of Technology in Thailand. An Aquaculture CRSP graduate student, in fact, focused on the lotus in her Master’s degree thesis.

The abstract of the thesis can be found at: http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/aquanews/fall2000/p4.html

An abstract of the Asian Institute of Technology research involving lotus is available as a PDF file in the Eighteenth Annual Technical Report:

http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs/technical/18tch/18tech_toc.html

(Download the abstract for the experiment titled, ”Lotus-Fish Culture in Ponds: Recycling of Pond Mud Nutrients (9NS1)” at http://pdacrsp.oregonstate.edu/pubs/technical/18tchhtml/9NS1.html)

Details on the Aquaculture CRSP lotus work plan: http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs/addenda/ninth/9NS1.html

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP websites (those beginning with “pdacrsp”), the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I would like to learn about marine aquaculture.
The Aquaculture CRSP has conducted some research on specific marine species. You can access Aquaculture CRSP reports though our publications webpage at: <
http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs>.

There are a number of other websites that can give you information to learn about marine aquaculture. An excellent source of information can be found at the AquaNIC website (<http://www.aquanic.org>). The Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution both performs research and conducts workshops on marine aquaculture. Visit their website at: <http://www.hboi.edu/aqua/aqua_home.html>

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP publication website, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am interested in the culture of Osphronemus goramy.
Participants in the Aquaculture CRSP have concentrated their research on tilapia and several other warm water species, but not the giant gourami. However, because the gourami is an herbivore, some CRSP research findings could possibly be applied to gourami culture. Many of our publications can be downloaded or read online at the CRSP website <
http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs/>. Since our grant had ended, we no longer provide printed copies of these publications.

We would also recommend <http://www.fishbase.org> as a good place to begin researching information about Osphronemus goramy.

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, is to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP publication and ordering websites, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am looking for information regarding health management strategies for finfish in earthen ponds.
Research performed by participants in the Aquaculture CRSP has not addressed disease issues specifically. A good first step in your search would be to contact the tilapia discussion group (you can join for free at <
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tilapia> . Water quality testing is a subject that comes up frequently in the discussions. Also, because members come from all over the world, the design elements specific to your situation may already have been addressed. If you have (or are willing to get) a Yahoo email account, you can review the group's discussions over the past year or so. Better yet, you can post your query to the group, and the members will likely have some helpful information.

In addition, a number of publications on fish health can be accessed through the AquaNIC website <http://www.aquanic.org>. From the “Resources” menu, click on “Publications.”

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I need information about early feeding of catfish. Because of inadequate knowledge about how to compound their food, what quantity to give per day and other ways of taking care of them, I lose a lot of them from the fry-to-fingerling stage.
The Aquaculture CRSP has done relatively little work on the Ictalurid catfish, but the following websites may offer some help in addressing this issue:

University of Guelph in Canada
<http://www.aps.uoguelph.ca/~aquacentre/ABM/Nutrition.htm>

University of Florida
<http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/BODY_FA010>

Mississippi State University
<http://msucares.com/aquaculture/catfish/feed.html>

Many links to aquaculture related sites:
<http://www.nal.usda.gov/afsic/afsaqua.htm>

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Aquaculture CRSP has done research on Clarias spp. in East Central Africa and Asia. You can access those reports via our website.

Finally, if you are interested in other catfishes (e.g., Basa- Vietnamese catfish) or want information on the above mentioned species, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am looking for information about tilapia sex reversion by heat. Would you please either explain how this can be accomplished or tell me where to look further?
An excellent place for you to begin your search would be through the AquaNIC web site <
http://www.aquanic.org>. From the “Resources” menu, click on “Publications.”

Another excellent option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I want to build a pond for tilapia. What is the ideal size and depth of the pond?
So many factors affect the decisions on pond size and depth that your question does not have a simple answer. The Aquaculture CRSP published a booklet on Pond Fertilization, by Christopher Knud-Hansen, which describes this complex topic. The booklet is available electronically on our website at <
http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs/fertguide_PDF/fert_guide_TOC.html> or can be ordered in a printed version (email us if you'd like us to mail you a copy at no charge).

Here are some general points that are made by Knud-Hansen:

“There is no ideal size for a tilapia pond. If you have a very small pond (less than 100 square meters surface area), you may have problems with suspended solids in the water. Turbidity can decrease algal production, and excessive sedimentation can limit nutrient availability. On the other hand, a very large pond without sufficient depth can also have problems with suspended material from wind mixing.

“There is no ideal depth either. In general, most ponds should be at least 1 meter deep. Very shallow ponds may have problems with resuspended bottom sediments increasing turbidity of the water in the photic zone (where light can penetrate). This results in decreased algal productivity and, therefore, less natural food for the fish. Very deep ponds require more water and more labor to build.”

With regard to pond depth, at least two further points may be relevant: 1) Ponds that are more than 1 meter in depth are difficult for workers to work in, particularly when harvesting by seine, because seining requires them to walk on the pond bottom while pulling the seine; and 2) Sunlight typically does not penetrate beyond about 1 meter into a pond, so phytoplankton production below that depth is limited.

Many of the decisions on pond size and depth must be based on the specifics of your land, water supply, budget, and plans. An excellent research option, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP publication website, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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Can you help me to start a tilapia farm?
Although the Aquaculture CRSP cannot directly assist you in developing a tilapia farm, we can provide some information that may be helpful. The Aquaculture CRSP has sponsored research on many facets of tilapia aquaculture for years. Although these papers may be more technical than you are looking for, you can access them at <
http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/pubs>.

Depending on where you are located, but especially for those of you in the United States, your nearest extension agent would likely be the most efficient way for you to start looking into this endeavor. These offices would be most familiar with local conditions and regulations and would also be able to tell you if anyone in your area has attempted this in the past. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://experts.seagrant.noaa.gov/sea-bin/SGDirsearch.pl>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://www.msstate.edu/dept/srac/theracs.htm>.

In addition, there are several aquaculture-oriented websites that provide support and information regarding starting up a farm, etc. The following list identifies several of these websites. (Please note, though, that the following sites are not supported by, endorsed by, or related to the Aquaculture CRSP):

AquaNIC website <http://www.aquanic.org>

World Aquaculture Society

Helpful links and job opportunities <http://www.was.org/Main/Default.asp>

There are also numerous websites that provide general information on tilapia aquaculture or specific aspects of a tilapia aquaculture venture. The following list highlights websites you may want to peruse:

Free membership to tilapia group (with over 100 entries a month) at: <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/tilapia>

American Tilapia Association
Education, member information and networking, government interactions and support for research information on tilapia: <http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/tilapi>

Link to the University of Hawaii’s "Tilapia Expert System Computer Program":

<http://praise.manoa.hawaii.edu/software.php/>

The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has collected resources regarding the business aspects of aquaculture at http://www.lib.noaa.gov/docaqua/financial.html.

Beginning an aquaculture venture has many challenges. It is an excellent idea to gather as much information as possible, to learn what regulations must be adhered to, and to speak with people who have had practical experience in the area.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP publication website, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am interested in the consumption of tilapia and other species of fish in the US. My main interest is to secure market data, volumes, and growth of the market. Can you help me?
Quite a bit of information about tilapia (and other species) markets in the United States and around the world is available on the internet. You may want to start with the American Tilapia Association, which has a web page of information about tilapia prices, markets, and imports, available at <
http://ag.arizona.edu/azaqua/ista/markets.htm>.

For species other than tilapia, you might want to look at the Fish Information Service website at <http://fis.com/>. They report on markets and prices for many capture fisheries, but also have some information about farmed salmon, trout, shrimp, and other species.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also has data relating to US consumption at <http://www.st.nmfs.gov/st1/>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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Our shrimp hatchery business is in need of technical and financial assistance. We would like to partner with the Aquaculture CRSP.
Thank you for your interest. The Aquaculture CRSP tends to partner with public and private non-profit organizations, but in some cases, partnerships with private industry have occurred. If your private business is seeking consultants for specific non-recurring work, an organizational partnership is usually not recommended. You may contact CRSP researchers listed on our website if their expertise is of interest to you. Many researchers serve as independent consultants and would be able to negotiate with you directly.

Please check out our website at <http://pdacrsp.orst.edu/> to get a better idea of the nature and purpose of the Aquaculture CRSP. The website identifies current projects, completed project reports, affiliated research institutions, and principal investigators. The website may also be useful because of the research on shrimp farming that the Aquaculture CRSP has conducted in the past. Some of the results gathered from the Aquaculture CRSP work may help you better establish your farm and farming techniques.

Another excellent resource, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

(Please note that with the exception of the ACRSP homepage, the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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Our company is interested in purchasing a food grade or USP grade chemical called d-glucosamine, and we need about 100 kilo per month.
Thank you for checking with us, but unfortunately, the Aquaculture CRSP is not able to endorse, recommend, or supply commercial products. You may want to visit the following website in your search for information:

Agriculture Network Information Center <http://www.aquanic.org>

Another excellent resource, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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Can you help me with information on solar powered aerators?
The Aquaculture CRSP has not funded research on solar powered aerators. As a publicly funded research organization, we cannot offer consulting advice, nor can we recommend or endorse commercial products. You may want to visit the following website in your search for information:

Agriculture Network Information Center <http://www.aquanic.org>

Another excellent resource, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am interested in producing trout feed and seek your help in search of information about modern technologies since I cannot find any relevant information locally.
Information about the production of trout feed is beyond the scope of our organization, which specializes in low-input culture of warmwater species. Further, as you probably know, companies that specialize in feed manufacturing treat much of that valuable information as proprietary.

You may want to visit the following website in your search for information:
Agriculture Network Information Center <http://www.aquanic.org>

Another excellent resource, especially for those in the United States, would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am looking for information regarding the process by which shrimp feed pellets are manufactured. Specifically, I would like to know about thermal degradation during the manufacturing process.
The research conducted by the Aquaculture CRSP has focused on semi-intensive culture of warmwater species in tropical and subtropical parts of the world; while some shrimp research has been sponsored, there has been little work done lately on shrimp feeds, particularly on the manufacture of pellets. Some CRSP reports on shrimp feeds can be found by manually searching through our publications for research done in Honduras. For the technical questions you pose, your best option would be a research library; food science journals may hold some of the answers. You might then contact the authors of papers that discuss thermal degradation of nutrients, for instance, and follow up with more specific questions.

You may want to visit the following website in your search for information:

Agriculture Network Information Center <http://www.aquanic.org>

If you are located in the US, a nother excellent option would be to discuss your interests with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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I am looking for a source to purchase tilapia seed on the Asian subcontinent.
We do not sell or otherwise provide any products other than research results. As to local suppliers of tilapia seed, we don't have any information. You may have luck in contacting the Network of Aquaculture Centres in Asia-Pacific. NACA's website <
http://www.enaca.org/> may be a place to get some information and leads on suppliers.

If you are located in the US, a nother excellent option would be to discuss your needs with a knowledgeable state extension specialist. A directory of National Sea Grant extension specialists can be accessed by visiting <http://www.nsgo.seagrant.org/other/sgdirectory.html>. Likewise, a list of primary extension contacts at the USDA-CSREES Regional Aquaculture Centers can be found at <http://ag.ansc.purdue.edu/aquanic/jsa/federal_guide/stateextension.htm>.

Finally, you might consider joining and posting your questions to the aquaculture discussions group – Aqua-L – with members throughout the world and having a wide mix of expertise. You can access Aqua-L specifics at: <http://www.aquacultureassociation.ca/aqual.html>.

(Please note that the above website links are not affiliated with the Aquaculture CRSP. While we hope they are helpful, they are not endorsed by the Aquaculture CRSP, and we cannot assume liability for the information contained within those sites.)

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