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PD/A CRSP Aquanews-Summer 2002

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Aquaculture in Kenya

by D. Liti and J. Munguti

enya’s aquaculture is based on warm water, cold water, and marine culture. The industry is supported by three major aquaculture farms: Sagana, Ngomeni, and Kiganjo. These provide fish seed, fish food, training, research, and extension services. Tilapia culture in Kenya is carried out basically at a subsistence level and is widespread throughout the country. Trout farming is not as prevalent, being currently confined to a few commercial farms near Mt. Kenya, while shrimp farming has not taken off despite the funding of the Ngomeni project by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and the United Nations Development Programme.

At the community level, interest in aquaculture is just beginning to emerge with many farmers making inquiries on whether the industry can generate adequate profits to improve their economic bases.

Major constraints that have contributed to the slow development of aquaculture in Kenya include inadequate knowledge of how to raise aquacultural animals, lack of quality fish seed, lack of cheap and high quality diets, and inadequate extension services. Another major problem is the lack of locally made—and thus affordable—equipment.


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